Recently in NYC Category

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untitled (lever) 2018

Sometimes a dumpster can add a little something to a very plain street.

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Some of the greens found at the Greenmarket are surprising.

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untitled (off Broadway) 2018

Not everything worth looking at on this magnificent street is overhead.

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untitled (lines) 2018

Otherwise, I'd call it a study of, while riding on, a [slow] subway escalator.

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untitled (dogwood moon) 2017

under a January dogwood moon, from inside the garden of our building

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This is a snapshot of the corner of Grand and Wooster, September 14, 2017, looking pretty much as it did in the early 80s, when I was briefly lodged in a Tribeca loft on Duane Street.

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untitled (after Weegee) 2017


I was thinking of Weegee's 'Afternoon Crowd at Coney Island, Brooklyn', but the pansies were thinking of moving up and down Broadway.

This image, captured on Monday, recorded an ephemeral moment between the time these little pots were unloaded onto the street pavement and the time they were carried off to their separate planters to welcome spring.

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untitled (Flatfix) 2015


This is an image of a streetscape I found on Knickerbocker Avenue in Bushwick this beautiful afternoon, on a walk between Los Ojos and Interstate Projects.

If I'm going to restart this blog, maybe I should be carrying around a camera other than my old iPhone. I like this image, but I can't help thinking Mr. NIKON could have done it better.

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Loren MacIver Fishers Island ca. 1952 oil on masonite 44.125" x 57"


The Loren MacIver painting above jumped out at me while I was lazily scrolling through the Brooklyn Museum Bot (@BklynMuseumBot) this morning while still lying in bed. I thought it was very beautiful. Once awake and at the table with my laptop, I looked for more about the artist and her work. Very interesting, both.

Shortly after I began browsing, I thought of another modern seascape. Marsden Hartley's "Evening Storm, Schoodic, Maine No. 2". That painting became a favorite of mine the moment I first saw it somewhere else on line. Some time after that I actually saw the Hartley in real space, at the Brooklyn Museum, which also happens to shelter the MacIver painting. The latter however is not currently on public display, except in an online image.


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Marsden Hartley Evening Storm, Schoodic, Maine No. 2 1942 oil on fabricated board 30" x 40.5"


It was conceived as an important visual document, accessible to the public and to institutions, which would describe the faces of a community and a moment whose memory is already fading from our consciousness.

The Kickstarter for the project needs a real boost as it winds down now, with less than three days to go. If the book doesn't get published, I think it will be a genuine loss for activism today.

Of course if it does get published, it won't mean a cure for AIDS. Also, to be sure, "The AIDS activist project: A new book of portraits of AIDS activists from around the globe" is not a vanity project for the artist, Bill Bytsura, or for those members of the historical ACT UP whose beautiful portraits will be a part of it.

Its importance is greater than the authors of the project or the subjects included in the book.

Pictures are important for understanding a past and inspiring a future, but pictures assembled in a context are still more important, and take on a life of their own. ACT UP was a movement which exploded in the late 80s, and burgeoned through half of the next decade, responding creatively, and often heroically, to a life and death crisis which was being ignored by an establishment which appeared to be unmovable.

Its people and the community they formed, along with the AIDS crisis which galvanized them, may be ancient history to a generation struggling today worldwide with an indifference among the powerful arguably even broader in scale - if, perhaps, less deadly. There is much to be gained today from looking at the devices employed, their successes - along with their failures, by a movement which flourished twenty and more years back. There's also the courage and nobility of so many of its members, and the anger and the love which was always a part of the movement.

Bytsura's book would give a face to an entire generation of activists (although in fact people of all ages were included in its membership), and it could serve an entire new generation as both muster to resistance, and powerful inspiration for effective resistance. Please help to breathe life into it, and consider contributing to its publication.


Full disclosure: Billy has been a friend since the days of ACT UP at it peak, and Barry and I have several of his beautiful non-activist photographs in our collection. There is also this portrait of a very young me, at 50, in 1990.

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